6 Reasons Companies Ignore Data Quality Issues

When lean businesses encounter data quality issues, managers may be tempted to leverage existing CRM platforms or similar tools to try and meet the perceived data cleansing needs. They might also default to reinforcing some existing business processes and educating users in support of good data. While these approaches might be a piece of the data quality puzzle, it would be naive to think that they will resolve the problem. In fact, ignoring the problem for much longer while trying some half-hearted approaches, can actually amplify the problem you’ll eventually have to deal with later. So why do they do it? Here are some reasons we have heard about why businesses have stuck their heads in the proverbial data quality sand:

1. “We don’t need it. We just need to reinforce the business rules.”

Even in companies that run the tightest of ships, reinforcing business rules and standards won’t prevent all your problem. First, not all data quality errors are attributable to lazy or untrained employees. Consider nicknames, multiple legitimate addresses and variations on foreign spellings just to mention a few. Plus, while getting your process and team in line is always a good habit, it still leaves the challenge of cleaning up what you’ve got.

2. “We already have it. We just need to use it.”

Stakeholders often mistakenly think that data quality tools are inherent in existing applications or are a modular function that can be added on. Managers with sophisticated CRM or ERP tools in place may find it particularly hard to believe that their expensive investment doesn’t account for data quality. While customizing or extending existing ERP applications may take you part of the way, we are constantly talking to companies that have used up valuable time, funds and resources trying to squeeze a sufficient data quality solution out of one of their other software tools and it rarely goes well.

3. “We have no resources.”

When human, IT and financial resources are maxed out, the thought of adding a major initiative such as data quality can seem foolhardy. Even defining business  requirements is challenging unless a knowledgeable data steward is on board. With no clear approach, some businesses tread water in spite of mounting a formal assault. It’s important to keep in mind though that procrastinating a data quality issue can cost more resources in the long run because the time it takes staff to navigate data with inherent problems, can take a serious toll on efficiency.

4. “Nobody cares about data quality.”

Unfortunately, when it comes to advocating for data quality, there is often only one lone voice on the team, advocating for something that no one else really seems to care about. The key is to find the people that get it. They are there, the problem is they are rarely asked. They are usually in the trenches, trying to work with the data or struggling to keep up with the maintenance. They are not empowered to change any systems to resolve the data quality issues and may not even realize the extent of the issues, but they definitely care because it impacts their ability to do their job.

5. “It’s in the queue.”

Businesses may recognize the importance of data quality but just can’t think about it until after some other major implementation, such as a data migration, integration or warehousing project. It’s hard to know where data quality fits into the equation and when and how that tool should be implemented but it’s a safe bet to say that the time for data quality is before records move to a new environment. Put another way: garbage in = garbage out. Unfortunately for these companies, the unfamiliarity of a new system or process compounds the challenge of cleansing data errors that have migrated from the old system.

6. “I can’t justify the cost.”

One of the biggest challenges we hear about in our industry is the struggle to justify a data quality initiative with an ROI that is difficult to quantify. However, just because you can’t capture the cost of bad data in a single number doesn’t mean that it’s not affecting your bottom line. If you are faced with the dilemma of ‘justifying’ a major purchase but can’t find the figures to back it up, try to justify doing nothing. It may be easier to argue against sticking your head in the sand, then to fight ‘for’ the solution you know you need.

Is your company currently sticking their head in the sand when it comes to data quality? What other reasons have you heard?

Remember, bad data triumphs when good managers do nothing.

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